Tag: cancer

  • Exploring Senescence and the Hayflick Limit (CER)

    Exploring Senescence and the Hayflick Limit (CER)

    Students explore cell senescence and the Hayflick limit in this activity. Short reading sections with questions are included with a graph to analyze.

  • Case Study – Mitosis, Cancer, and the HPV Vaccine

    Case Study – Mitosis, Cancer, and the HPV Vaccine

    Students in my anatomy class get a quick review of the cell and mitosis. This activity on HPV shows how the cell cycle relates to overall health. In fact, many of the chapters in anatomy have anchoring phenomena on diseases and health. For example, cystic fibrosis is a cellular transport problem, but has serious effects…

  • Jim Allison: Breakthrough

    Jim Allison: Breakthrough

    The film, “Jim Allison: Breakthrough” can be streamed through online platforms, like PBS or from Amazon Prime Video. Teachers can sign up for a free license at  https://www.breakthroughdoc.com/for-educators The film is 1 1/2 hours long, which is longer than most class periods, and many teen attention spans, so I split the worksheet into two halves.…

  • Devils, Chromosomes and Cancer

    Devils, Chromosomes and Cancer

    This is a good follow-up activity to the Tasmanian Devil Karyotype, where students examine how the chromosomes of cancerous cells can be altered. It is a short read about a transmissible cancer found in Tasmanian devils which causes facial tumors. This cancer, known as is has already killed 85% of the overall population and threatens…

  • Investigation:  Mitosis and Cancer Cells

    Investigation: Mitosis and Cancer Cells

    The first part of this investigation, students examine slides of mitosis in an onion root tip and count the number of cells in each phase of the cell cycle.¬† An equation is then used to estimate the percentage of time the cell spends in each phase and students¬† create a bar graph to display results.¬†…

  • Zoobiquity – Review and Discussion Questions

    Zoobiquity – Review and Discussion Questions

    I try to read at least one non-fiction book per year to try to keep myself up to date and inspired with new knowledge and advances in medicine.   I have a classroom set of “Stiff” that I require my AP Biology students to read during the unit on anatomy.  Recently, in a graduate class…